Stories from middle America

I have spent almost an entire year finding excuses to not finish a living room revival I committed to last summer.

But, to be fair, one excuse is pretty legit. An excuse that may haunt me forever: my budget. It’s always encouraging me to get back to the basics and just live with what I have.

I truly believe in the value of a well-thought-out design. Obviously. That’s what I do everyday at Birdhouse. However, I live in a world that doesn’t always understand that value. It’s sometimes difficult to calculate the monetary value of my professional experience, and it’s even harder to explain that value to a very money-focused society. So I’m using my own living room revival to demonstrate how a professional (me!) can help create a space with aesthetic qualities to love, a space that helps a family function, and a space where family can interact with one another easily and comfortably.

By addressing certain problems within my own living room, I was able to come up with a solution for a room that functioned at its best.

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Problem: Elongated shape of the room and an awkward layout off the dining room.

Solution: I created a main conversation/television watching area on the long wall of the room and another little seating area along the short wall. I layered a variety of textures and accessories to trick the eye into believing the room had better flow, mostly by focusing on other really personal additions to the room. I added new lighting, a new-to-me peacock wicker chair, a new walnut coffee table with the most amazing shape, and gave everything an overall edit to tame all the colors going on in my styling habits.

Living-Room_2 Living-Room_6

The coffee table was built by Benjamin Petersen of Timbersmith. I worked closely with him to make this table something really special. I sent him an inspiration shape and an overall concept for the table. After selecting the materials to be used — walnut and hairpin legs — he built this one-of-a-kind piece for me. I am overwhelmed with the result!

Problem: Budget

Solution: Make a list of items needed and shop according to those needs. This eliminates excess spending. I found the peacock wicker chair for $9 at a local antique store. I selected lighting that was inexpensive: the floor lamp by the wicker chair I found at Target and the new floor lamp to the left of my sofa is IKEA. I also added depth to the room with new, lighter curtain panels. I took these panels all the way to the ceiling to create an illusion of height.

Living-Room_3

These panels are Nate Burkus for Target and just what my budget was looking for.

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Lastly, I restyled my bookshelves by editing all the color I had previously incorporated. This helped make it more cohesive and pleasing. It’s still an eclectic mix but now a mix that all works together.

Even though I don’t love the¬†extended completion date this project ended up having (!), I’m happy that it stayed true to the concept I created. It’s turned my living room into one the most enjoyable spaces for my family and me. As a designer, that is my North Star, my point. This project is so close to finished. I’m still on the hunt for artwork above my sofa though.

Problem: Art budget

Solution: Make my own original art. I LOVE original art, but my budget just won’t allow for that. By bouncing several of my ideas off Jessica, we’ve come up with a concept for this art that fits me completely. But, shh! The only thing I’m going to share about my art today is it’s vibe board.

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I apologize for the very amateur photos I’ve got here for now.¬†Until I have my artwork complete and have professional photos taken, these will have to do. Stay tuned!

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